Author Topic: BUILDING A DOLL-STAND  (Read 23502 times)

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Eagle1

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Re: BUILDING A DOLL-STAND
« Reply #30 on: August 26, 2011, 12:05:31 AM »
Why not make something like Gibbmodoll uses, a modified hydraulic gearbox lift



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happiness

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Re: BUILDING A DOLL-STAND
« Reply #31 on: October 17, 2011, 03:14:49 AM »
I was looking at that with Roust. Those things can be expensive and heavy in themselves. Something more practical would be better I think.
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ourdoll1

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Re: BUILDING A DOLL-STAND
« Reply #32 on: October 20, 2011, 03:49:26 PM »
it may be archaic, but what about a simple block and tackle?
Two 'blocks' of pulleys, one rope.  One block fits to the doll's neck bolt, the other affixed to the stand.  Light and can lift ALOT of weight. 

At Mcmaster.com, you can get them.  http://www.mcmaster.com/#tackle-blocks/=ekrgo3

#6 is a double - pulley block.  a pair of those with a common rope, and you'd have a good mechanical advantage.  8)

coralsheep91

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Re: BUILDING A DOLL-STAND
« Reply #33 on: October 21, 2011, 04:38:39 AM »
I have the double I bought from Harbor Freight.  http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?q=Pulley+Hoist
The one I bought does not have the hanger shown in the picture and only cost $9.99

I can pick Layla up with one hand which is saying a lot. It is made to lift up to 440 lbs and thats just about what she feels like  :laugh:.  I put a small brass hook on the head board to hook the rope to.  There is not much weight on the hook so it does not have to be very strong as most of the weight stays on the pulleys.  It works great and I'm sure it would work well with the doll stand too.

Coral
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muzza

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Re: BUILDING A DOLL-STAND
« Reply #34 on: October 22, 2011, 04:12:25 AM »
I tried to incorporate a block and tackle to one of my doll stands but it did not really work. Unless the top of the stand is fairly high it has limited value.
In the end it all depends how and for what your doll will be used, and we are all different in that regard.
It took me over a year to work out the best systems for me to manage my dolls. Essentially they are a block and tackle system over the bed, their individual stands on wheels and a spare stand for moving from one level to another and a garden swing set (see photo, bulky but useful - sorry about the mess but just snapped pic for thread illustration).
What one must understand about a block and tackle system is that a fixed stable anchor point and tie down point are necessary.

muz
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happiness

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Re: BUILDING A DOLL-STAND
« Reply #35 on: October 30, 2011, 11:13:30 PM »
I think the block and tackle idea is exactly what Roust had in mind for the doll stand for my male doll. Welding will be involved I'm sure.
I don't have the 'know how', but Roust does.  :) We can make it work. I'll help by making him do it!  :laugh:   ^-^
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guitarpussy

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Re: BUILDING A DOLL-STAND
« Reply #37 on: January 05, 2012, 09:15:04 PM »
Camp,

Ingenious, and well thought out.  The first stand I put together was made out of PVC.  It worked well but is too large.  I had a look at those stands now sold by Sinthetics, and they are very nice, but cost $350.  Your design will work as good if not better, and wheels could be added too.

Good job,

GP

muzza

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Re: BUILDING A DOLL-STAND
« Reply #38 on: January 06, 2012, 08:10:38 PM »
The Doll Stand I made for Cami.

Basically it is:

5 various lengths of 35mm x 90mm (70mm would do) of wood - the type used for studs behind walls in house building.
4 various Angle brackets - from hardware store. See photos.
4 Castor wheels.
Various screws, Nuts and Bolts to suit.

You will need an electric drill (with suitable drill bits), a screwdriver and a spanner to suit bolts.

The bum support has one of the short lengths of wood padded with foam and bound with soft material. Its sliding device is a bit complicated and fiddly and probably not necessary as the pressure of her bum or back holds the support in place, it does not need much.

Larger size images for those interested go to the gallery pics http://www.ourdollcommunity.com/gallery/thumbnails.php?album=375




   


 

muzza




Ah Love, could thou and I with fate conspire to grasp this sorry state of things entire. Would not we shatter it to bits, and then, remould it nearer to the hearts desire.

Mark_at_MaddyG

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Re: BUILDING A DOLL-STAND
« Reply #39 on: January 08, 2012, 11:39:31 AM »
Here's a shot of the Doll Stand we recently built by Camp's design.

We shortened the top arm, and made the height exact, so Tasha's feet stand on the platform.

We added wheels to the base, and painted the whole thing Chroma Green for video work.




mytime

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Re: BUILDING A DOLL-STAND
« Reply #40 on: January 08, 2012, 11:57:06 AM »
Muz,

That wooden design even easyer to make than the camp stand, great idea.
Mark, nice work.

I have welded myself one very simular to the ones Matt & Bronwen use in their shop I copied their design, my one has a 28X28" base  its a very nice stand to use being busy with dolls  (i.e. building) cause its so stable.
I do not sell this one cause its a M&B design.
Its height adjustable so I can set the height so that Carmen's weight rests partly on her legs, so she stands naturally.

IMO height adjustment is preferable above fixed height, Mark, certainly for your work, cause when you change dolly's shoes, you've to change the height of the stand. Look at how incrediwagon changed a Camp-stand into a height adjustable one.
For Carmen on high heels another height is needed than for Carmen on gympies or bare feet.
Here a teaser shot Carmen showing it off:


Mytime & Helen & Carmen
Doll community member since april 2003, doll owner since august 2004

Mark_at_MaddyG

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Re: BUILDING A DOLL-STAND
« Reply #41 on: January 08, 2012, 12:53:14 PM »
Quote
IMO height adjustment is preferable above fixed height, Mark, certainly for your work, cause when you change dolly's shoes, you've to change the height of the stand. Look at how incrediwagon changed a Camp-stand into a height adjustable one.

I agree Mytime, for a 'standard use' stand, height adjust is essential. For us though, our uses are very specific right down to the shoes she'll be wearing. So all our supports and stands are usually designed to do one specific thing with the least amount of materials possible (to give us the least 'removal' to deal with in post production).

Otherwise, I certainly would have added height adjust to it. 

incred

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Re: BUILDING A DOLL-STAND
« Reply #42 on: January 08, 2012, 08:30:42 PM »
We started using air quick disconnects in stead of the hook for a couple of reasons,

1, Moving from a wall bracket, or stand, to a stance modifier meant sitting the doll down and changing the neck bolt. This way you unplug her and plug her in  8)

2, It also has the advantage on the stands of being ridged like the modifier so you don't need a back pad to keep her off the pipe, or to keep her standing straight.

It does take a bit of getting use to plugging and unplugging the connector, to make sure of the "click" when engaging.

If people want to use the new mounting system I bought all the pieces at McMaster-Carr; http://www.mcmaster.com/#=diolsf

These are the parts, but if you want to buy a finished set from me just send me a PM.

Quick-Disconnect socket; #6534K85
Quick-Disconnect plug #6534K73
Hex Socket plug #44605K233
3" stud #90281A636 (for Sinthetics)
2" stud #90281A632 (for Realdoll/Boy Toy)

Here is what it looks like on a stance modifier;













mytime

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Re: BUILDING A DOLL-STAND
« Reply #43 on: January 09, 2012, 12:28:32 PM »
Mark wrote
Quote
I agree Mytime, for a 'standard use' stand, height adjust is essential. For us though, our uses are very specific right down to the shoes she'll be wearing. So all our supports and stands are usually designed to do one specific thing with the least amount of materials possible (to give us the least 'removal' to deal with in post production).

Otherwise, I certainly would have added height adjust to it.


Hmm,

Maybe me, due I'am not in movie business, but I can't understand.
Adding height adjustment to a stand means adding a pin, and just choosing another type of tube for the last 20" of the vertical tube that fits in the vertical tube and drilling some holes.
Maybe it adds 2 lbs material at worst, but it saves out a lot storage space on different stands for different height.

Mytime & Helen & Carmen
Doll community member since april 2003, doll owner since august 2004

Crizzman

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Re: BUILDING A DOLL-STAND
« Reply #44 on: January 18, 2012, 08:43:52 AM »
Camp, this is very helpful, can you help me get a photo gallery please?? I am new on here, want to get to know other doll lovers and share my new Lara Croft by Matt and Bronwen!
Gentlemen prefer blondes..!!