Author Topic: ODC amateur doll photographer's tips and tricks thread- Pros welcome too!  (Read 19449 times)

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TC

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Coral asked if I would start a TC's photo tips thread, and as I mentioned in the reply post it would be insanely short if it were only my tips!  :laugh:
I saw the studio lighting sticky thread (great info!) and thought of adding to that, but there are a few tips that really don't fall under that category.
I am sure that there are tips here and there throughout ODC, but I was not able to find a thread consolidating them. 
If there is one, we can most certainly add this post to that thread and just keep it going, but just in case there isn't I am starting this thread and HOPING
that anyone who would like to share their tips and tricks and ideas would post here making this a valuable source of doll photography info.

I know that I for one would be very glad to read other members' tips and tricks as much as I am glad to share with those that are interested!



The first thing I want to address is Coral's question as to why some of Sophie's pictures look 'soft'.
There are 2 things that I do that might contribute to that effect.

The first is the camera flash- I use a piece of tissue twist tied over it to tone it down or diffuse it.
You can cover it completely varying the thickness of the tissue to change the amount of light coming through
or have it partially covering the flash to 'direct' the light to the side or top to get great effects.
How close you are to the doll makes a big difference when doing that so using a zoom lens helps you get
the right distance away to get the light how you want and still be able to get the part of the doll in the picture that you want.




I really like having the light shoot out the top like in the second example and having it bounce off a
mirror and then back on Sophie- it creates wonderful shadows- and I do like shadows!




The other thing I do is use the 'noise' edit function in my software to reduce the graininess of a picture-
if I think it looks grainy because the light was too low and/or the ISO was too fast. This seems to 'soften' the pictures a little.
Using the exposure and color adjustment edit functions probably do not add to the softness look, but it does help a less than perfect shot look almost perfect!

I hope this info helps a little  :)

Please feel free to add to these ideas or expand on them- this is NOT just my thread!

TC

WinstonSmith

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Re: ODC amateur doll photographer's tips and tricks thread- Pros welcome too!
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2011, 02:55:13 PM »
My best tip would be indirect light. Bounce your light off of a white posterboard onto your subject, if possible. Direct light is usually not very flattering.

coralsheep91

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Re: ODC amateur doll photographer's tips and tricks thread- Pros welcome too!
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2011, 07:49:39 PM »
Thanks guys!

I have no Idea what I am doing......

I just set my camera on auto, point and shoot.

The camera was a very nice camera in it's day and can be set just like an old 35mm.

I just have not had time to learn how to use it.

After seeing the pictures here I want to learn.

These are great tips that I would have never thought of.

I will try them both.

Please keep them coming!!!

I am all ears eyes.

Coral
Layla's , Nicky's and Nicole Ann's pictures are here: http://www.ourdollcommunity.com/gallery/index.php?cat=10378

Camp

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Re: ODC amateur doll photographer's tips and tricks thread- Pros welcome too!
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2011, 07:54:59 PM »
Making this a sticky !
Talking Doll Since May 26, 2004

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JerksOfAmerica

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Re: ODC amateur doll photographer's tips and tricks thread- Pros welcome too!
« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2011, 01:18:55 AM »
I like to set my lighting up and shoot on the manual setting. I have all kinds of photography equipment but mostly use 2 soft lights that are consistently on, what I see thru the view finder is what I get a picture of, lighting and all. That way it's lit for video or photos.

most importantly is composition of your subject. boring composition = boring picture.

I'd say, out of 200 pictures taken in one photo shoot, I only post 5 to 10 of the over all very best.
Take multiple pictures of the same shot or pose. so that when you are viewing them on your computer you can pick the one that looks best. Then only post that one. If not, your photos become repetitive and no one wants to look at them all.

you don't need a super nice camera to take super nice pictures, you just gotta know how to use the equipment that you have correctly. take the time to figure it out, it's worth it.

If you lack creative ideas, look at magazines or ads for ideas and recreate them to the best of your ability.

these are just a few tips and tricks that I thought of real quick. Hopefully they help ya out with your next photo shoot.

mytime

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Re: ODC amateur doll photographer's tips and tricks thread- Pros welcome too!
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2011, 06:16:48 AM »
Hi All,
I want to express some thoughts and basic guidelines about camera's and using them here I hope people benefit from this.
I try to keep it short and simple, but some things need some explaination though its did still become a lengthy post.

Small camera's like pocket camera's and even cellphones or disposal camera's can do good photo's when used right, though I personally would prefer the DSLR over the pocket camera and the pocket camera over the cell phone and the disposal camera.
However the bigger the image sensor the better the quality photo the camera can make will be, there will be less noise, so a APS-C size sensor camera does a better job than a pocket camera and a full frame camera with a 35 mm sensor does a better job than an APS-C size sensor camera regarding photo quality. This is one of the reasons why some people decide to buy more expensive gear.
Keep in mind that this is just about "quality" and "less noise" and "just a little more sharp" even a quality photo can be dull if the doll is not posed creatively so people with a pocket camera can come with photo's that are more amazing than people who come with an expensive full frame DSLR and do not pose and light the doll nice.
The number of pixels is not the most important thing on a digital camera, the quality of the pixels is more important and this is where sensor size often comes in.
Though on the other hand a bigger sensor makes a camera bigger, and this comes with disadvantages too (does not fit any longer in your pocket, not needed for doll photograpy but for normal photograpy the best camera is the one you have always with you so you don't miss just that nice chance to make that outstanding photo.).

As with each job the better the tool the neater the job is done, but the tool does not make you a better photographer, its like buying a welder, you need to learn to weld. Though on the other hand there is a difference you need to be creative as well. So about 80% is photographer, and 20% is camera, though if you go into photograpy you will find that the more expensive gear is more convenient to use, and uses more buttons and dials for setting the camera instead of running through menus. This does not mean that very good photo's with cheap camera's are not possible, it takes only some more effort.

About pocket camera's buying and using them:

When going shopping for pocket camera's, Canon has a lot good ones of them, I think you simply can not go wrong with a Canon pocket camera though there are a lot other nice ones. Canon pocket camera's use often the same processor (not to be confused with the image sensor) as their bigger DSLR brothers, I mean, they use e.g. the DIGIC III processor which is used also in a lot Canon DSLR's.
Ken Rockwell (a photographer, camera reviewer) recommends the following models from Canon S95 IS 380 US$ till Posershot A480 US$70 refurbished,http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/recommended-cameras.htm, even the 70 US$ powershot A480 does a good job I owned one.

The use of a tripod will pay off certainly when using small camera's like pocket camera's, I think here comes the first advance of the pocket camera over the cell phone, the pocket camera has always a hole in the bottom in which the bolt of the tripod fits, thus easyer to use.
When wanting the best results, use the count down timer on the pocket camera to take the photo while using the tripod, the system will be free of vibrations movements.

Setting things like white balance right will help a lot, experiment with white balance.
Put it on thungsten when the light used is thungsten.
Put it on fluorecent when the light is fluorecent.
Put it on daylight when the light is daylight (though some camera's have different settings for sun or a cloudy day).

Once the right setting is found keep it the whole photoshoot (this can be difficult with day light cause this can change from sun to cloudy during the shoot).
As far I know most pocket camera's except some Canon model's like the G12 and the S95 can not shoot in the "RAW" image format, thus they do not enable  you to change settings like this with ease in a computer program like Adobe Photoshop or Lightroom, so setting it right is a good idea.

Try to focus on the doll's eyes, these should be as sharp as possible on the photo.

Although this is not so important for doll photography I do mention that this type of camera, together with a cleaning cloth and an extra battery, opposed to DSLR's  does fit with ease in your pocket, which makes it a fun to take with you and travel with, and can be as far I experience, be big fun to use due to this.

About system camera's:
Although I have no experience with them, I beleive the things I mentioned at the pocket camera for light balance and using a stand do hold for this camera's too.
System camera's are between DSLR's and pocket camera's. It looks to me to be a new idea of camera to enable more people to take advantage of an APS-C size sensor to get DSLR quality photo's. The system camera is small like the pocket camera but it can use several lenses that are simular to the DSLR lenses.
Though system camera's use their own set of lenses, for using DSLR lenses (I mean putting Canon or Nikon lenses on it) they need often an adapter for it or it is not possible. System camera's don't use the mirror that the DSLR camera's use. Due to this they got their small size and due to this can not be used for photographing fast moving things (sports) while DSLR's can. Well our dolls are up to today not fast moving things so I think they will suit this job, though I think its good to mention that.
This leaves you when you buy a system camera with a camera with less possibility's than a DSLR, though I think that it can be a good buy for people who want a camera that is as easy to use as a pocket camera and also is almost as small as a pocket camera but want to have the benefit in quality due a Four thirds DSLR or APS-C DSLR size image sensor and a camera which is very easy to use.
I have no experience with them though I wanted to mention them due one who would like to have a DSLR and the advantages of the bigger image sensor that camera has compared to the pocket camera, but does want one that does not need a learning curve and wants to spend 800 US$ or so on it could have a nice camera with this ones. I think that most system camera's if not all except the Leica, have been invented to be entry level camera's with entry level costs, however I think due the high numbers of DSLR's put out by Canon, Nikon and Sony, entry level DSLR's and their lenses are often more affordable than this camera's / lenses.

Examples of them are:

Sony NEX-3 and Sony NEX-5 (do adapt all Sony alpha lenses and a lot Konica Minolta lenses with a special adapter).
Olympus PEN (very beautifull retro design camera, although the Nex-5 offers little better photo's due it uses an APS-C size sensor and this one uses the Four thirds sensor.).
Leica M9 (full frame camera which originates from the famous 1930's Leica range finders, costs as much or more than a silicone high end doll nice for the happy few one can get plenty of beautifull lenses for them. Mentioned to put complete information, but only very few will buy this for photographing dolly's due the high price.).

Personally I think people who would like to photograph with a DSLR but would like to have it in a package that is easyer to use and smaller (often only little bigger than a pocket camera although this does not hold when using tele lenses) and want to spend some more money on it than on an entry DSLR could benefit from the system camera's.
Another advantage over the pocket camera could be that it may be possible to get a light sensitive portrait lens (which is in the case of the Nex-5 a 50 mm lens and in the case of the pen a 40 mm lens (though a 50 mm could do) for this camera I do not know this cause I do not own them. If possible it would increase the use of this camera for doll photography quite over the pocket camera cause it enables you to photograph with less light. For this camera all things about light balance and tripods I mentioned in the pocket camera paragraph hold.

About DSLR's
For DSLR's the things I mentioned at the pocket camera for light balance and using a stand do hold too.
DSLR's have the disadvantage to cellphones, pocket camera's, and system camera's that they are bigger and do not fit in a pocket and thus that you need always to take at least a handbag size bag with you with the camera, and some lenses inside. DSLR's can photograph in the "RAW" image format, thus you can change a lot settings in a computer program like Adobe Photoshop or Lightroom.
DSLR's come today with 3 sensor formats, four thirds (multiply by 2 a 50 mm lens becomes 100 mm), APSC (multiply by 1.6 for Canon and other brands and by 1.5 for Nikon DX), Full frame (expensive but do not multiply focal length, sensor is as big as 35 mm film) and beside that some very expensive camera's that probably none of us maybe except Stacy... will buy which have even bigger image sensors (Hasselblad 60 X 60 mm).

I would not recommend them to every one, like the pocket camera's, or maybe the system camera, only to people who like to do more with photography and would like to experiment more with photography.
Though they are today easy to use, put it on the setting called  "auto" and it photographs, the camera does all settings. But this camera is IMO not really intended to be used this way, its bit more for people who like to read the manual to find out how to get the max benefit of all its functionality.
Though people who want a camera only to take with ease some photo's may have more benefit from the pocket camera's or the system camera's.
On the other hand when going DSLR I think you will like the nice big view finder over the lcd display on the back of the camera, for focussing and photographing dolly right.
Regarding the image sensor, certainly for starting, APSC which is DX for nikon, will do, I would not pay the high price for full frame for my first DSLR.

Advantages are that you can set everything as you want it in this type of camera which makes it a very nice camera for people who want that and who want to learn more about photography.

An important thing about this camera is that you need to think about which brand you go to use, cause when you buy extra lenses you can only use them with that brand.
With Nikon some more thinking is needed cause the entry level camera's of them like the D3100 (although this is a good and small camera) lack the internal motor, due to this this camera's do not focus automatically with some of the Nikon lenses, although there are enough lenses available with simular focal length with internal motor, only these are more expensive.
With this camera's for doll photography a portrait lens does a good job.

For APS-C camera's a nice lens for dolls is a 50 mm prime lens. I'am talking here about a thing that can be bought for starting at 100 US$ so I think its worth the read.
A 50 mm lens is good this is due to that the image sensor the 50 mm lens works like an 80 mm or 75 mm lens on this camera and thus makes it a portrait lens (focal length goes multiplied by 1.6 for Canon and 1.5 for Nikon (due their DX sensor). Portrait lenses for full frame DSLR's and SLR's that have to be e.g. 80 mm primes are much more expensive than a 50 mm prime.
This camera's come often with a 18-55 mm tele lens, zoom 50 mm and it be put in usage too for doll photography though this standard lens is not as light sensitive as the prime.
While the wide angle side of the lens, the 18 mm => 29 mm on the APSC camera, could be put in usage for making a photo of the whole room with the doll sitting on the sofa e.g.
It could be for doll photographers who want a Nikon and want to get it new, be a good deal not to buy the entry level D3100 but to pay little more for a D90 which price has dropped due it is being replaced by a more modern body with that motor and thus be able to adapt and focus all or at least most Nikon lenses. This is an issue, cause its much more difficult to focus a DSLR right manually than an SLR due the view finder of the DSLR has not the "cat eye" the SLR has.
With that body you can use the just over 100 US$ 50 mm f1.8 lens while with the camera's that lack the internal motor you need to use the about over 300 US$ 50 mm f1.4 lens, although this one has a stop more light sensitivity, the f1.8 lens could do already a lot when you start out.
So when buying Nikon its a good idea to look at the internal motor. Besides that you can choose to buy a flasher with your camera, one of the advantages of an external flasher is that you can turn it so it bounces to the ceiling and lights your doll with indirect light.

As far I know with Canon, this does not hold, and I have seen that the cheapest Canon 1000D which is a Rebel XT from which some functionality is removed to cut cost, does focus with their cheap 100 US$ 50 mm f1.8 lens. Thus this combo may be a good buy for one who wants to start with a Canon DSLR for doll photography. I think you can get this camera or a new but older type overstock Rebel XT for really low prices (500 US$ new) compaired to what you get.

Regarding Sony camera's I do not have experience with them, though I know they do put the imaging stabilizer in the body of the camera while Nikon puts their VR (vibration reduction) and Canon puts their IS (image stabilisation) in the lenses. Due this Nikon and Canon lenses with image stabilisation are more expensive than Sony lenses, you don't need to buy image stabilisation in the lens cause it sits in the body.
However image stabilisation in the lens seems to work a little better.
Though Sony camera's do work, Nikon and Canon camera's are as per today still more convenient to use due to those two brands have been making camera's for over half a century.

Although I think most doll photographers that go DSLR go buy an entry level one, and this models will certainly do the job very well, one remark, it may be good to study the DSLR's, it could be that it makes you saving up more money for a just one step more expensive model if you find out that the just little more expensive model has e.g. the handy dial for Aperture on the body, the other one lacks, making it you having it to set in the menu or by turning the dial on the lens.

You can save out some money buying older model or pre owned.
Also a good thing to mention with DSLR's is IMO that there is a big market of good pre owned DSLR's from people who upgrade to newer or more advanced body's so, if one looks for it with care, they can often be bought pre owned and in good condition for prices simular to pocket camera's just for the people who want one. I have seen quite often older models of pre owned full frame camera's especially Canon's 1D MK II / 5D for nice prices, so if it has to be full frame on small budget (like photography students) pre owned could be a deal.  Though that is pre owned gear, so one depends on how the previous owner did use the camera, though there are sometimes offers from people that handle their camera's well and also there is refurbished and tested pre owned gear offered at sites like adorama http://www.adorama.com
Also one could often do a good deal with buying a new one from a model that is at its "end of life" the price often drops quite a lot when a successor for a certain model is introduced. The older models like the Nikon D90 (see below the image attached of my D90 with the 50 mm AF 1.8D lens (good affordable lens, little over 100 US$ I think). and the Canon 1000D could be a good deal today, taking this in account. Due the strong competition between Nikon Canon and Sony the prices of this phantastic gear is not high considered to what it can do. Also buying one from a good webshop instead of at a real shop can save you a lot money.
Further, DSLR's are already some time available, and a e.g. 3 year old model will do a good job when photographing a doll (you don't really need the latest model)
I have photographed with a Nikon D40 6 MP, and it simply did the job, it only lacks that internal motor I wrote about.
Current DSLR's are all very good, thanks to the huge competition between their manufacturers probably every effort to improve them has been taken, although one should take care not to get dust in the camera, the image sensor has to last the whole life of the camera body (in film days one did pull the handle, to use a fresh sheet of film for each picture). When dust on sensor, have camera serviced or remove it with an air bellows, never touch the sensor. Also software for correcting for dust is available.

SLR
If you don't want to spend much money on a camera body,  say 200 US$ or less at a garage sale, and do fit in the DSLR category (are prepaired to study photography and don't worry about a hand bag size package to take with you) and don't take much photo's but want to have probably better quality photo's than prof full frame DSLR quality then a pre owned proffesional SLR like a Nikon F4 with a good lens could be a deal  8). Today you can use the best film available e.g. a Fuji Velvia 50 and have it processed to prints and digital files at costo http://www.costco.com (Edit 8 February 2011: You get probably very beautifull photo's but to get this quality really into scans I wonder if costco gets it done, if not, you need access to very sophisticated drum scanners and scans will be very expensive thus you get very nice printed photo's but the digital photo's of a good  modern DSLR will be of better quality for the web unless you want to pay for very expensive scans.) If you manage to get a good one (its prof gear so rugged, but too often quite heavily used) then it will work though it comes with 3 disadvantages, you can not see immediately the photo, film and processing cost a lot money and on the long run more than the money you saved out, and you have to send doll photo's to a image processing house, they will process them though they will get to know that you own beautifull dolls too... Other newer preowned and thus probably slightly more expensive prof. slr camera's are the Nikon F5 and the Canon EOS 1V. Going Nikon one could also consider a F100 which as far I know can be of simular usage as the F5, both do autofocus and use VR with all modern Nikon lenses. I think today only few people will choose this idea, however who knows what happens, a lot people are buying turntables today and records, while all your music can be put probably on one small usb stick. Canon did stop at the EOS-1V but maybe Nikon hopes on this revival of the SLR, being pioneers in the SLR technology they are still developing the SLR, and the F6 is the latest one. For people who own already Canon or Nikon DSLR gear they may want to experiment with a pro film body, the lenses of the body they own will probably fit, when using the same brand although some lenses are special made for the  smaller image sensor and may not work on the prof. film body (though one has to study the lenses and the body to know this for sure).


Mytime & Helen & Carmen





Doll community member since april 2003, doll owner since august 2004

TC

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Re: ODC amateur doll photographer's tips and tricks thread- Pros welcome too!
« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2011, 01:11:25 PM »
Good stuff so far- I can see that I will be learning quite a lot as we go!

A little trick that most who know me know about- I like to use mirrors or reflections. The mirrors let me see more than one side of Sophie at a time.
The reflections help me create a beautiful illusion. Sometimes the results are amazing! Just make sure the mirror is clean.
Here are three examples:


This shot is a reflection in a mirror. The light from the flash bounced off the mirror creating the sexy shadows.





This next picture is the result of a reflection of Sophie off the glass of a painting of a wolf in winter.
It took quite a while to get the light in the right spot and her reflection positioned the way I wanted.
I just love the illusion it creates!





This next picture is a result of Sophie's reflection in a small mirror that has a wildlife scene painted on it.



It was almost the most difficult shot I ever took of her. Positioning her and the quilts that would make up the background and foreground,
and getting the mirror to stay in a position that created the effect that I was looking for was quite difficult.
You can see the pic was cropped heavily to remove the excess scenage:



The original had way too much distraction in the background. For some reason that I can't remember anymore,
I was not able to get the camera any closer to the mirror to eliminate the distractions, so I had to crop.


Don't be afraid to crop out background distractions to expose the picture that you want to see.

TC

coralsheep91

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Re: ODC amateur doll photographer's tips and tricks thread- Pros welcome too!
« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2011, 02:19:49 PM »
Does everyone use a tripod?

I do not have one yet but have been thinking it may help?

Those are killer pictures TC!

Thanks to all that are posting, my cup runneth over!

I am hoping you can teach an old sheep new tricks...  :o

Coral
Layla's , Nicky's and Nicole Ann's pictures are here: http://www.ourdollcommunity.com/gallery/index.php?cat=10378

WinstonSmith

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Re: ODC amateur doll photographer's tips and tricks thread- Pros welcome too!
« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2011, 04:14:23 PM »
Adobe Photoshop has always been my best friend.

siliconelover

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Re: ODC amateur doll photographer's tips and tricks thread- Pros welcome too!
« Reply #9 on: February 06, 2011, 04:23:21 PM »
Does everyone use a tripod?

I do not have one yet but have been thinking it may help?


Coral

Hi Coral, Yes, invest in a Tripod ...... Don't worry about a zillion features, in the end you want something sturdy, well built. Buy what you can afford, I use SUNPACK's myself.
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Mahtek

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Re: ODC amateur doll photographer's tips and tricks thread- Pros welcome too!
« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2011, 10:17:30 PM »
I always use a tripod, and the camera's timer. That way the camera has a couple of seconds to "settle down" after pressing the shutter.

I have a full size and a mini tripod. The mini is great for those shots where the full size can't get far enough back and I need to set up on a shelf or furniture.


Mahtek & his Ladies
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siliconelover

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Re: ODC amateur doll photographer's tips and tricks thread- Pros welcome too!
« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2011, 10:44:57 PM »
I always use a tripod, and the camera's timer. That way the camera has a couple of seconds to "settle down" after pressing the shutter.


Good point Mahtek, I am lucky enough to have a remote control for my camera so I never have to touch it when needing to shoot.

I also can't agree more with the mini tripod, it also protects your camera when setting it down etc.
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mytime

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Re: ODC amateur doll photographer's tips and tricks thread- Pros welcome too!
« Reply #12 on: February 14, 2011, 04:48:54 PM »
Mahtek,

Usage of a tripod is indeed a very good idea, certainly indoor, if the shutter time goes below 1/60th.

Guys I did write a bit too much about gear in my previous post. Cameragear is nice, and may contribute to some photo quality but keep in mind that composition and light and thus creativity is way more important. I just looked on what I did with an old Pentax K1000+55 mm pentax 2.0 prime, (bought for about 100 euro pre owned in 2000) see the bad flatbed scan from what was a good photo IMO below...(which is an analog camera that takes a film), and there were a lot nice sharp photo's among them. Although it did take a lot effort to take them (due that manual focus is difficult, for dolls it may work for moving objects its a pain IMO). So even an 25-30 y.o. camera can do a lot (and keeps working in very dusty, cold, wet, bad circumstances, even without batteries (why else was Vietnam war reported on a Nikon F...) where digital camera's may get trouble but thats another story). Film is IMO not bad stuff, but digital photography is however a marvel today and enables a lot people to learn photographing and also make photographs at much lower cost than they ever would be able in the days of the film.


Mytime & Helen & Carmen
Doll community member since april 2003, doll owner since august 2004

Ray Rentell

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Re: ODC amateur doll photographer's tips and tricks thread- Pros welcome too!
« Reply #13 on: February 15, 2011, 06:28:07 PM »
Nothings changed so I will re-post  this old one as it still applies.

.First off you need lots of time. 

As every one said get a tripod and most if not all digital cameras have a timed shutter release built in..

Theres plenty of photo sites giving lots of advice, use a search engine, a good line would be "studio lighting".

Ebay has a very large section of studio lighting stuff, theres all sorts of lights , remote flashes, softboxes, backgrounds, the list is endless.
So as well as time you will also have to spend a bit of money. Or use sunny days. 



Set it all up and experiment with different lights , positions and so on until you find a combination that suits you ...... that's where the "lots of time" comes in 

Or do what I do and take lots of pics and hope to hell theres at least one good one in there.
Sunny days are best , I am no good at using lights, never get the time to experiment .... back to the first sentence again !

So really the only real suggestion I can make is "get in close" .... fill the frame.

Good luck with it all


And adding that composition is more important than technique or camera, bum pose , bum pic and believe me I take plenty of bum shots!.
for album click the pic

siliconelover

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Re: ODC amateur doll photographer's tips and tricks thread- Pros welcome too!
« Reply #14 on: February 15, 2011, 08:55:14 PM »
That's Great concise advice Ray. Experiment, Lighting, Tripod, auto shutter or use the right hold of your camera and use your zoom to get the right amount of light and tone to show in your photo's.

And Stacy always say's this as well, Fill the Frame.

Learn how to do makeup and accentuate your doll with jewelry.

And pay attention to detail, (Stacy is the Queen of this aspect) have a clean backround and a theme planned to play out.

Lighting, Lighting, Lighting ...... Different Distances and Zoom, Zoom, Zoom. & Relax, take your time, because it is going to take time, smoke it if you have it, makes for great creativity and a good time !
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