Author Topic: Race Seat  (Read 691 times)

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KarmaMusic

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Re: Race Seat
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2019, 09:32:39 PM »
She didn't miss a thing at all  :redhead: :drool: :drool: :thumb:
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Ceej

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Re: Race Seat
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2019, 10:12:52 PM »
At least she knows how to dress   8)  Nekkid, or nearly so  8) :thumb:
"Leaving it to the imagination" is highly overrated.




Sandy is a B6 Classic Realdoll, Nicole is a Realdoll Petite 5. They both share classic F1 faces as well as all the classic F1 expression faces. Sandy also has several sets of reuseable "Real Breast" prosthetic breasts.

Halleheals

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Re: Race Seat
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2019, 10:13:05 PM »
Safety first!  :thumb: :drool:
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Stephanie Doll

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Re: Race Seat
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2019, 01:59:25 PM »
Epic!

Mahtek

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Re: Race Seat
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2019, 09:44:30 PM »
Did she win?

The rest of us did with those pics!  :thumb:


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Begog

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Re: Race Seat
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2019, 09:56:03 AM »

USA! USA! USA! :drool:

This is why I love being an American!  :D

Doll-lover

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Re: Race Seat
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2019, 04:35:04 PM »
Did she win?

The rest of us did with those pics!  :thumb:


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Of course she won!! The hearts of everyone!!


Feguro

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Re: Race Seat
« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2019, 01:09:33 PM »
Sorcha  :redhead:
Love the better and cheaper suit. :drool: :-*

Smoke

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Re: Race Seat
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2019, 02:31:59 PM »
Scorcha makes any seat look good!!!   :drool: :drool:
If the Ladies don't find you handsome.  .. Get a doll.

sloopjohnb

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Re: Race Seat
« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2019, 05:29:59 AM »
Incred, if you don't mind. How long do you figure this shoot took? Starting the set up to your tear down. I know you're better (more  experienced) that a lot of us, so just  looking for a rough estimate.
   I know how long it takes me to do a simple shoot, if I can get her dressed with out becoming, well, you know, distracted!
Thanks, Sloop

incred

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Re: Race Seat
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2019, 09:34:33 PM »
Lets see. Assuming Sorcha was already in the basement with the race seat, and the flag was set up too, about 15 minutes to get her in the seat and strapped in, lights set up, and camera ready. 

The first saved picture was snapped at 4:00pm Nov 22,2018, and the last pic was snapped at 6:45pm.

I took about 70 pictures. Kind of a small shoot  ;)

Not sure on the tear down. Either I left her on a stand or brought her upstairs, which is more likely  :whistle: but I probably went to dinner first since it was nearly 7:00.

So it looks like around three hours just for the shoot. Not sure on the editing. Most of that time was spent on cleaning up the background.

The real time saver is that I didn't dress her  :whistle:

JunkGuy

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Re: Race Seat
« Reply #13 on: March 02, 2019, 02:55:19 AM »
You take a lot more time between photos than I do. Not that its a problem because its good quality stuff.

For comparisons sake (in case sloop is interested), most of the shoots I've done comprise between 20 and 30 poses, but many of them are standing because my doll can, though that's not true of all.  Sitting (or laying) the whole time would obviously make for an easier shoot.  3 hours seems a little long to me if doll was sitting the whole time and didn't undergo any undressing, and only 70 photos is remarkably efficient, unless you meant to say you took more and only had 70 keepers.  I take between 500 and 800 photos, but only keep 8-10%. A lot of this is due to my doll's glasses reflecting the flash or other lights ruining the photo, so I take many photos at slightly different angles (few inches higher, lower, to left or to right) to mitigate this.  And I may notice something after snapping a few that requires attention, like stray hairs. Most of my finished shoots end up between 40 and 80 kept photos, with a single pose used in 2 or 3 photos at different angles (much more than the few inches different as needed for reflection mitigation.) Set up time really depends on how much effort is expended to make up the environment.  I've spent dozens of hours on some complicated ones, and only a few on others. I generally apply makeup, wig, and clothing in early morning, and this takes an hour or two, it takes me half an hour or so to get my doll into position and any last minute environment setup, and then I start shooting around 10 and finish mid-afternoon, taking a break for lunch sometime in the middle).  Sometimes I'll adjust and start later in the day, or even go for evening. (One time, I even shot in the middle of the night for appropriate lighting purposes.) Tear down is usually pretty quick, 20-25 minutes, because its always easier to disassemble than to assemble.  So on shooting day, my end to end effort usually runs in the 7-8 hour range. But this doesn't take into account anything I did to prepare earlier in the week, especially the night before, or any post-photography stuff like filtering which images to keep and digitally cleaning those that I do.  Shooting day is obviously the most physically and mentally exhausting, but its usually 20% or less of the total time for me.

One thing I've discovered that really speeds things along during a shoot is to plan your poses beforehand. I draw stick figures of the poses I'd like to use or try, with big circle heads and eyes to show iris direction or a word or two of notes if needed. It also allows me to craft something of a storyboard to tell a little story in each shoot (though a great deal of it is usually just a striptease.)  I have this storyboard done by at least the day before shooting, and with it can plan the order in which to take the photos (not always the order they're presented) to minimize differences in posing. Changing doll from sitting to standing position, or undressing and redressing takes a lot of time and effort, and going into a shoot with this "battle plan" already made up saves me both time and energy, and likely results in better photos because I can also use it as a checklist to be sure I don't miss a shot needed to tell the story. (Though typically there's at least one pose that proves too difficult to pull off and I have to improvise. The plan is never a set of commandants as much as its a set of guidelines.)  Shooting from the hip is certainly fine for a photoshoot, but without a plan you're more likely to be pressed for time (especially if your lighting conditions are subject to change, i.e. sunlight), you fail to execute a particular pose as you'd wished, or there's inconsistencies in your photo sequence.

I'm sure experts like Incred have something of a plan in their head going into a shoot, but I still like to put mine to paper. (And I've kept them for review so I can recognize things I could do better in the future.)

incred

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Re: Race Seat
« Reply #14 on: March 02, 2019, 07:32:59 AM »
To a certain extent I have done most of what you have done. I haven't done story boards or stick figures, but if I see a particular picture and want to recreate it, I would print it out for reference. A good example is this;



I remembered it as kid as the model was in a snowstorm while the artiest was painting her. I know it is different than that, but  :redhead: and 40 years will do that :whistle:

Anyway For this one picture I needed to load two dolls in the truck and drive three hours to Northern NH. Then setup the 'set'



Basically the set is 500 feet from the road and had to snowshoe everything in which consists of walking in and packing down the area, setting up the stands, easel, tripod/camera, and lastly the two 85lb. dolls. To do that I set up a doll dollie halfway because I couldn't wheel it in deep snow. I would carry the doll to the dollie to stop and rest, then on to the stand.

As luck would have it after a couple hours of setup it started to snow. All to get just one picture, this one:



Sometimes the're technical difficulties, like the pallet I brought was too big so I improvised and used the actual drawing I brought for the setup. I supposed I should have it turned the other way for the colors  :facepalm:

I almost always use a tripod for several reasons but mostly consistency. I can layer a picture in photoshop if I want, or make a stereograph or add/subtract things easier. I also don't take as many pictures because I set up the shot, take several, and move to the next shot.

Out of the one picture I will get a few different poses or angles before really changing the setup. You can see the shoot here;
http://incredidoll.com/gallery3/index.php/Painting?page=1

Back to the time. You can see that sometimes one picture leads to a whole shoot with different poses, but there no planning other than the one pic. This does take more time, but I just leave it to what inspires me at the time. Then comes the tear down.
 
This had to be a relatively quick shoot because of short daylight, setup/tear down time, and the six hour drive.